Renos chats to Rehane Abrahams about Womb Of Fire

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Tune in to Saturday's Role With Reno: O Rolos Tou Savattou Me Ton Reno, Saturday mornings on The New Pan Hellenic Voice - Greek Community Radio 1422MW from 8am to 11am
Tune in to Saturday’s Role With Reno: O Rolos Tou Savattou Me Ton Reno, Saturday mornings on The New Pan Hellenic Voice – Greek Community Radio 1422MW from 8am to 11am

On Saturday morning’s edition of Saturday’s Role With Reno, host Renos Spanoudes spoke to Rehane Abrahams about Womb Of Fire.


Rehane Abrahams
Rehane Abrahams

Womb Of Fire.

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Womb of Fire is the starting point for an examination of the performing female body as the site of disruption where the body itself challenges the borders and boundaries of the body politic. The play uses a non-Western mythical frame. Personal, historical and political intersections flesh out and localise the myth of Draupadi from the Mahabharata, expanding the moment featuring Queen Draupadi that began the epic war. The title pays homage to Mahasweta Devi’s re-rendering of the figure of Drauapdi as a tribal activist in a story that forms part of her collection, Agnigharba (Womb of Fire).

Womb of FireIn the original myth, Draupadi stands before a court of men who attempt to deprive her of her humanity and strip her naked; through divine intervention she remains clothed. In Devi’s retelling however, the tortured Draupadi uses her naked body to challenge the might of the Indian army. Stripping herself, she stands naked and laughs in the face of the army general, who in that moment fears her. She does not lament, she roars.

Womb of Fire
Womb of Fire

The Mothertongue Project was started in 2000 by Sara Matchett and Rehane Abrahams with the production What the Water Gave. Since then, both Abrahams and Matchett have been separately researching the body as a site for personal and political agency and embodied performance as a practice of freedom. Now, some 17 years later, the two return to see how their explorations intersect in a production that focuses on the female body in performance as a site for disruption and decolonisation. Blending new methodology, new research with a wealth of experience the two are set to explore a new lexicon in performance practice.

Presented by The Mothertongue Project in association with UJ Arts & Culture (Fada) and supported by the University of Cape Town.

Listen to Renos’ interview with Rehane Abrahams here:


Tune in to Saturday’s Role With Reno: O Rolos Tou Savattou Me Ton Reno, Saturday mornings on The New Pan Hellenic Voice – Greek Community Radio 1422MW from 8am to 11am

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